c-suite

Outsourcing C-Suite Roles

Increased technology has allowed the outsourcing of many business roles, but could this also include your C-suite, or leadership, roles? This is becoming especially common for the CFO (chief financial officer) and CMO (chief marketing officer) positions. Less common roles, like chief investment officers or chief information security officers, may be outsourced as well if they are required for the company’s operations. Companies today can hire for these roles on a part-time or fractional basis.c-suite

With the modern ability to work remotely, individuals in these roles have the ability to work for multiple clients from one source. Traditionally, companies have had numerous layers of management. But with the growth of information technology and increased automation, companies today are able to operate under a leaner structure.

Is it right for your company?

The companies benefiting the most from this trend of part-time executives are small and mid-sized companies. They can tap into the expertise and leadership of these executives without paying for a full-time role they can’t afford and realistically, don’t require for business operations. Cyclical or seasonal operations can produce long lulls for some of these roles, so it’s more cost-effective to pay a more qualified part-time executive than a less experienced, full-time executive.

The alternativec-suite

A small business owner’s first instinct is to not hire for the role at all, but instead, to try to take on some of the tasks in addition to their ownership and leadership roles. We caution, however, that this can end up being a more time-consuming, and less cost-effective, solution. Owners are already being pulled in numerous directions. Adding these additional roles to your plate, for the sake of saving some money, can lead to long-term costs from mistakes and errors that may be incurred by novice work.

Rather than take on these roles yourself, consider outsourcing as a solution for filling these roles with part-time, qualified candidates.

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tax calendar

Tax Date Calendar for Small Businesses

April 15 may be in your rear view mirror, but your business still has tax-related obligations throughout the year. Don’t let these dates sneak up on you unexpectedly. Know what you need to file and when for the upcoming year:tax preparation

June 17, 2019: Q3 Estimated Quarterly Income Tax Payments Due

If your business pays estimated quarterly taxes, and these payments were prepared along with your Simma Flottemesch & Orenstein tax return, this is the deadline for your Quarter 2 payment.

September 16, 2019: Q3 Estimated Quarterly Income Tax Payments Due

Time to make your Quarter 3 payment.

September 16, 2019: S-Corp and Partnership Extension Deadline

Did you receive an extension for your S-Corp or partnership tax return? Then this is your deadline for submitting the return and payment.

October 15, 2019: Extension Deadline for Individuals, Sole Proprietors, LLCs and Corporations

This is the deadline for submitting your return and payment for any extended individual, sole proprietor, LLC or C-Corp tax returns.

December 31, 2019: 401(k) Deadline

Any contributions to you or your employee’s 401(k) but be completed by the end of the year if they’re to count toward your 2019 return.tax calendar

January 15, 2020: Q4 Estimated Quarterly Income Tax Payments Due

The taxes that were estimated for Quarter 4 are due in mid-January.

January 31, 2020: 1099 and W-2 Mailing Deadline

For your traditional employees, you must get their W-2 forms in the mail by the end of January. Any 1099s for contractors you worked with during 2019 must be postmarked by January 31 as well.

March 16, 2020: S-Corp and Partnership Tax Return Deadline

S-Corps and partnerships must file their 2019 tax return and submit payment by March 16, a month before the individual return deadline.

April 15, 2020:

  • Tax filing deadline for individual, sole proprietor, LLC and C-Corp returns
  • Q1 estimated quarterly income tax payments due
  • Simple Employee Pension (SEP) contribution deadline
  • IRA contribution deadline, for both traditional and Roth IRA accounts

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ben franklin

Tax Day | A Brief History

Today’s the day: tax day, April 15. This day is as much ritual to our country as national holidays. However, despite the ceremonious processes that accompany it, it’s more of an anti-holiday in the eyes of most taxpayers. Some years, tax day shifts slightly to accommodate Emancipation Day (a holiday in the District of Columbia), but for the most part, falls on April 15 if the date doesn’t fall on a weekend. So how did April 15 become the deadline for settling our debts to the government?  We bring you a brief history of Tax Day.we the people

The 16th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1913, established the right of the federal government to directly tax individuals. This Amendment was adopted on February 3, 1913, so Congress opted for March 1 of 1914 to be the first filing deadline. However, this amendment didn’t impose an income tax—that arrived with the passage of the Revenue Act of 1913 on October 3, 1913. This act stipulated that individuals with an annual income exceeding $3,000 for single filers or $4,000 for married couples were required to file a return. Those numbers sure have changed!

The new deadline became March 15 when the Revenue Act of 1918 was passed, giving taxpayers a couple extra weeks to gather their tax materials. It wasn’t until 1955 that the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 established April 15 as the new deadline. The explanation for the change was to help taxpayers as the tax laws became more complex and convoluted. House Ways and Means Committee Chair, Daniel A. Reed, expressed that this extra month would also help accountants, tax preparers and the IRS spread out their tax season workload. Another theory arose: that as the income tax applied to more of the middle class the government was issuing more refunds, and the extension of the deadline allowed the government to otherwise utilize those funds longer.taxes

Interestingly, the previous deadline of March 15 symbolically corresponded with the Ides of March—a date on the Roman calendar that served as a deadline for settling debts. As Benjamin Franklin famously said, “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” While he wasn’t referring to federal incomes taxes at the time, it’s a fitting sentiment. Taxes are woven into the fabric of our country from their establishment in the Constitution. While today may not feel like a holiday to you, tomorrow is a holiday of sorts for your CPA. Congratulations to you and your CPA on surviving another tax season.

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Business Structures: Ownership and Liability Differences

The most common differences in business structures are ownership, liability and tax considerations. When it comes to liability, it’s important to consider where you, as an owner, could personally afford liability risks. Protecting personal assets is a key reason people incorporate their business, and while some structures are easier to form than others, it can be difficult to change your entity’s structure down the line, so avoid restricting your business’s ability to grow in your selection.

Sole Proprietorship: Sole proprietorships are simplest to form, and if you don’t register your business as another entity, you’ll automatically be considered a sole proprietorship. Owned by one individual, this structure comes with the greatest personal liability. As the business grows, your personal liability will increase. Therefore, this structure is best for lower risk businesses. Also consider that it is difficult to obtain outside funding for sole proprietorships.

Partnerships: Partnerships are owned by two or more people. The partners will share in any profits, losses and decision-making responsibilities. These entities require an operating agreement that outlines the roles of its owners and the percentage of profits they each receive. Consider that you will be held liable for both decisions you make, and those made by other owners. Funding for these entities will generally come from the personal accounts of its owners, their personal credit or by taking on more partners.board room

Limited Liability Company (LLC): Forming an LLC protects you from personal liability if you don’t act in a manner that is in any way illegal, unethical or irresponsible when carrying out business activities. Personal assets and company assets are deemed separate under this entity. This structure is great for medium-high risk businesses and owners with a lot of personal assets they want to protect.

Corporation: Incorporating your business makes it a separate entity from its owners. That entity can be sued, own and sell property, and sell ownership rights in the form of stocks. No individual owner has sole or primary control. Instead, most corporations have a Board of Directors to answer to. More specifics apply depending on the type of corporation…

C Corp: C-corps are ideal for medium-high risk businesses, businesses that need to raise outside funds and businesses that intend to go public or eventually be sold. As you can see, forecasting where you would like to see your business go or grow into, is important to many of these considerations.

S Corp: S-Corps are intended for smaller corporations. There can be no more than 100 owners, and all must be United States citizens.

B Corp: B-Corps differ from other types of corporation in purpose, accountability and transparency. In some states, B-Corps are required to submit annual benefit reports to demonstrate that they are indeed contributing to the public good.

Closed Corporations: Closed corporations are similar to B-Corporations. However, these generally smaller companies are usually barred from public trading.high rise

For a more simplified depiction of this breakdown, reference the following table:

Business structure Ownership Liability Taxes
Sole proprietorship One person Unlimited personal liability Personal tax only
Partnerships Two or more people Unlimited personal liability unless structured as a limited partnership Self-employment tax (except for limited partners)

Personal tax

Limited liability company (LLC) One or more people Owners are not personally liable Self-employment tax

Personal tax or corporate tax

Corporation – C corp One or more people Owners are not personally liable Corporate tax
Corporation – S corp One or more people, but no more than 100, and all must be U.S. citizens Owners are not personally liable Personal tax
Corporation – B corp One or more people Owners are not personally liable Corporate tax
Corporation – Nonprofit One or more people Owners are not personally liable Tax-exempt, but corporate profits can’t be distributed

 

Later this week, we’ll delve into the tax differences and implications of each of these business structures.

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Choosing a Business Structure: Types of Entities

You’re starting your own business, but what type of legal entity will you establish for the business? It can be difficult to balance the advantages and disadvantages of these structures. So let’s review the options and simplify those considerations:

Sole proprietorship:

A sole proprietorship is the simplest form of business entity. In this scenario, one person is responsible for the company, its profits and its debts. The most common way to structure your business, it is easy to form and gives complete managerial control to the owner. At the same time, the owner is then personally liable for all financial obligations to the business.

open sign

Partnership:

When the entity is owned by two or more individuals, it is a partnership. The partners agree to share in both the profits and losses of the business. These profits and losses are reported on the partners’ individual tax returns. However, each partner is still personally liable for the financial obligations of the business.

  1. Limited partnerships (LP): when one general partner has unlimited liability, and the other partners have limited liability. The limited liability partners also tend to have a limit on their controls over the company, as documented in a partnership agreement.
  2. Limited liability partnerships (LLP): limited liability is given to all owners of the company. An LLP protects partners from the partnership’s debts, so they are not responsible for the actions of their partners.

Limited liability company (LLC):

This business structure is a hybrid that limits personal liability for its owners, partners or shareholders, while enjoying the tax and flexibility benefits of a partnership. Therefore, personal assets will not be at risk if the LLC faces bankruptcy or lawsuits.

conference room

Corporation:

Corporations are viewed as entities that are separate from their owners. Therefore, a corporation has legal rights that are independent of its owners. Corporations come in five different types:

  1. C Corporations: these legal entities are separate from their owners. Therefore, they make profits, are taxed and can be held legally liable. Shareholders are provided with strong protection against personal liability, and the departure of a shareholder or sale of stock doesn’t disturb the continuation of business by the C Corporations.
  2. S Corporations: much like partnerships or LLCs, owners have limited liability protections and avoid double taxation by passing profits and some losses directly to the owners’ personal income while avoiding corporate tax rates. There are special limits on S Corporations.
  3. B Corporations: benefit corporations are driven by mission and profit. So while they service society in some way, they maintain a for-profit structure.
  4. Closed corporations: traditionally smaller companies with an informal corporate structure, closed corporations do not participate in public trading and are typically run by a few shareholders without a board of directors.
  5. Nonprofit corporations: organized for the purpose of charity, education, religious, literary or scientific works. As benefits to the public, they are tax-exempt.

Cooperative:

Cooperatives are owned and operated for the benefit of those using its services. Cooperatives are generally run by an elected board of directors or officers, while regular members have voting power to contribute to the direction of the cooperative. Members join by purchasing shares, but the amount of shares they hold does not increase or decrease the weight of their votes.

In our next blog, we will dive deeper into the advantages and disadvantages of these structures, and the tax implications of each. Visit the Simma Flottemesch & Orenstein blog to follow along.

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