business expenses

Deductible Business Expenses

The best way to find out what business expenses can be deducted from your income is to consult with your Simma Flottemesch & Orenstein representative. Reducing your business’s income by expenses means you have less money to pay taxes on. However, the scope of potentially deductible expenses is a wide range. Do yourself a favor and keep as detailed records as possible, especially when it includes the following:business expenses

General Business Expenses

Unfortunately, there is no master list of what the IRS allows your business to deduct. Instead, your CPA can help you determine whether certain expenses are incurred as a “cost of carrying on a trade or business.” At a minimum, these may include:

  • Office supplies
  • Utilities
  • Furniture and equipment
  • Software
  • Advertising
  • Rent or mortgage payments
  • Wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions and employee health insurance premiums

The IRS also requests, in the classification of these expenses, that they be “ordinary and necessary.” It defines such as “an ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your trade or business. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for your trade or business.”

Other Business Expensesauto expense

You are allowed to deduct up to 50 percent of the costs of meals and entertainment when those outings are associated with business operations. Therefore, the event must take place immediately before, after or during a business discussion.

If you are staying on top of your business knowledge through the use of trade magazines, business seminars or other learning materials, these books, magazines and educational programs can be deducted from your taxes. Make sure the subject matter of these materials contribute to your ability to run, maintain or improve your business or trade.

When you start your business, any startup costs are considered capital expenses rather than business expenses, since business expenses cannot be incurred until your business is up and running. In the first year of business, up to $5,000 of your capital expenses can be deducted. What remains beyond that $5,000 can be deducted from your taxes for up to a 15-year period.

Special Expense Deductionshome office

Home office and auto expense deductions are calculated in two different ways. These methods include the standard method or the actual method. For auto expenses, the standard method is a deduction of 53.5 cents per business mile, plus toll and parking fees. The home office standard method allows a deduction of $5 per square foot, with a maximum of 300 square feet, or $1,500. Using the actual method for auto expenses requires you add up all auto expenses (gas, repairs, oil changes, etc.), and multiply the total by the percentage of miles that were used for business purposes. The actual method of calculating your home office deduction requires you add up all home expenses and multiply it by your home office percentage (office square footage divided by your home’s total square footage). For the home office, any expenses related to the space are included if the space is used exclusively and regularly for business.

Working with a CPA from Simma Flottemesch & Orenstein will maximize your business expense deductions by making sure all expenses relevant to your business are accounted for. Doing your taxes yourself often leads to these deductions slipping through the cracks or being inaccurately recorded. Get peace of mind when you prepare your taxes with a professional from our offices.

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records

Retaining Your Tax Documents

Whether the results of this most recent tax season had a positive or negative impact on your bank account, it’s important to consider how long you should retain your tax documents. This includes a copy of your tax return and any documents providing support of income or deduction items, as well as evidence for any credits received.  A period of limitations is determined by the IRS based on the time in which you could amend a return to claim a credit or refund, or during which the IRS can assess additional tax.

The general rule of thumb is three years. This means you should retain a copy of your return and supporting documents for that return until three years from the filing due date. For example, you should keep the information regarding the return that was due April 15, 2019 until April 15, 2022, at the very least. Keep in mind, these periods are federal guidelines. States may have their own statute of limitations.tax records

Exceptions

There are a lot of “buts” in tax circumstances. Fittingly, if you claim a bad debt deduction or a loss from worthless securities, retain your records for seven years instead of three. If you have ever filed a fraudulent return, or forgotten to file a tax return, the IRS requires you keep your financial records for your lifetime.  Finally, if for some reason, 25 percent of your income was not reported on your tax return, the IRS has up to six years to impose additional tax.

Period of limitations

The IRS has provided the following information on a period of limitations for different scenarios:

  1. Keep records for 3 years if situations (4), (5), and (6) below do not apply to you.
  2. Keep records for 3 years from the date you filed your original return or 2 years from the date you paid the tax, whichever is later, if you file a claim for credit or refund after you file your return.
  3. Keep records for 7 years if you file a claim for a loss from worthless securities or bad debt deduction.
  4. Keep records for 6 years if you do not report income that you should report, and it is more than 25% of the gross income shown on your return.
  5. Keep records indefinitely if you do not file a return.
  6. Keep records indefinitely if you file a fraudulent return.
  7. Keep employment tax records for at least 4 years after the date that the tax becomes due or is paid, whichever is later.shred

Disposal

A good scanner has made the electronic retention of these records fairly efficient. However, when disposing of your records and prior tax returns, it’s important to shred any physical documents that may bare identifiable information. Poorly disposed of documents could make you susceptible to identity theft. For electronic information, be sure to have strong security software in place. Keep in mind, that although the IRS may no longer have a use for your records, they could be needed by your insurance company or creditors, in some cases.

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